Transposition

As I spend time relearning things that have gotten out of practice, I am having to write articles here so I can have quick access to them.

Transposition on the trumpet is one of the most important skills that an orchestra musician can have in their tool belt.  It is an absolute must.  Orchestral music was written with the instruments of the time and area.  With the advent of the piston trumpet/cornet, there is very little use of older style instruments.  At times conductors will ask for them simply for the timber that they produce to help make an authentic artistic representation of the piece.  Keep in mind, my music history knowledge is very limited and is essentially limited to the Norton Anthology.

Here is some important information that you need to know when you get a piece of music and are not sure what you need to do.  I do not speak multiple languages, but I can make out most tempo markings and instrumentation on a score.

Language Instrument Keys Other
English Trumpet C,D,Eb,E,F,G,Ab,A,Bb,B major, minor, flat, sharp
Italian Tromba DO,RE,MIb,MI,FA,SOL,LAb,LA,Sib,Si maggiore, minore, bemolle, diesis
Frensh Trompette UT,RE,MIb,MI,FA,SOL,LAb,LA,Sib,SI majeur, mineur, bemol, diese
German Trompete C,D,Es,E,F,G,As,A,B,H dur, moll, is, es

I have attached a PDF from Wikipedia with a full list of these, but these are the most common ones that I have come across.

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4/13/18 Clarke Studies & Long Tones

I am getting really tired of Clarke Studies. Regardless of my long hiatus, I have been on Clarke #2 and #3 and parts of #4 for a long time. They are starting to get really old, but at the same time, I know that these are essential studies of all trumpet players along with long tones.

This is the first time that I have had the equipment to record myself and really be able to listen back to the recording. I started my break back when CDs were out but CD recorders were really expensive. Now I am able to record myself and listen back and analyze what I hear.

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4/12/18 Long Tones & Arban’s

Today I took to the horn to spend some time recording long tones.  I have never been the type of musician who played a single tone for as long as possible.  I do on the other hand like playing long tones in Allen Vizzuti Trumpet Method Book 1.  There are a variety of long tones all based on chords.  It helps to hear these chords.  I also buzz these chords using my BERP while fingering.  I will play these tones on both Bb and C trumpets in order to help distinguish between the transposition while always keeping in mind the concert pitch.

Recordings

  1. Long Tones #1
  2. Long Tones #2
  3. Arbans – The Art of Phrasing: Loving I Think Of Thee
  4. Arbans – The Art of Phrasing: Robin Adair

Attacks, a necessary study

Today I decided to spend some time working on my attacks on middle G in the staff and middle C.  This is a very difficult skill.  This along with lip flexibility.  The problem that I am running into is that I took so long off from playing that my skills have severely diminished.  While I still have some skills, I have a serious lack of endurance.  I am so impatient with my practice as I want to have the skill right now but I know that it all comes with time.

Here are two recordings of my most recent practice on attacks both buzzing and playing.

Playing

Buzzing

Any constructive feedback would be appreciated.  Telling me that it sounds horrible is something I already know.  Each day is a step in the right direction.

Practice Mutes

Today I got a LotFancy aluminum trumpet practice mute in the mail (see attached pictures).  It does a great job of stopping the sound.  I can practice when my family is now sleeping.  From what I can tell it is not great for intonation but it will give you a great option for late nights working on technical skills.

I got the mute on Amazon.com